Last modified on 23 July 2014, at 16:01

Reynosa

Reynosa, Tamaulipas
Collage of Reynosa
Collage of Reynosa
Official seal of Reynosa, Tamaulipas
Seal
Nickname(s): La Metrópoli Industrial de Tamaulipas
Motto: Trabajar por la patria es forjar nuestro destino
(To work for the motherland is to forge our destiny)
Location of Reynosa within Tamaulipas
Location of Reynosa within Tamaulipas
Location of Tamaulipas within Mexico
Location of Tamaulipas within Mexico
Coordinates: 26°05′32″N 98°16′40″W / 26.09222°N 98.27778°W / 26.09222; -98.27778Coordinates: 26°05′32″N 98°16′40″W / 26.09222°N 98.27778°W / 26.09222; -98.27778
Country  Mexico
State  Tamaulipas
Founded 14 March 1749
Government
 • Mayor Everardo Villarreal Salinas (2011–present) (PRI)
Elevation 33 m (108 ft)
Population (2010)
 • Total 608,891[1]
Time zone CST (UTC−6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC−5)
Website www.reynosa.gob.mx

Area Code 899

Airport
General Lucio Blanco International Airport

Airport Code
REX

Reynosa is a border city in the northern part of Tamaulipas, Mexico. It is located on the southern bank of the Rio Grande, directly across the border from Hidalgo, Texas in the United States. As of 2010, the city of Reynosa has a population of 608,891.[2] If its floating population is included in the census count, however, the population can reach up to approximately 1,000,000.[3]

Reynosa is the largest and most populous city in the state of Tamaulipas, followed by Matamoros, Nuevo Laredo, Tampico, and Ciudad Victoria. In addition, the Reynosa–McAllen Metropolitan Area counts with a population of roughly 1,700,000 habitants,[4] making it the third largest metropolitan area in the Mexico–U.S. border. Reynosa is the 30th largest city in Mexico and anchors the largest metropolitan area in Tamaulipas.

Reynosa is the fastest growing city in the state of Tamaulipas, and lies among the top five fastest growing cities in Mexico.[5]

HistoryEdit

Reynosa was founded on 14 March 1749 with 297 inhabitants by Carlos Cantú under the command of José de Escandón y Helguera the Count of Sierra Gorda. But due to flooding in the area on the 4 July 1802, they decided to move five miles to the east keeping the same margin between them and the Rio Grande. It was not until 1926 that the state government recognized Reynosa as a city.

Reynosa was first named Villa de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe de Reynosa. The pioneers of the Villa proceeded from El Nuevo Reino de León, especially from Monterrey, Cadereyta, Cerralvo and El Pilón. The town was composed with 50 families. It was given the name of Reynosa as a tribute to the town with the same name in Spain, birthplace of the Viceroy de Güemes y Horcasitas.

Between 1846 and 1848, Reynosa was captured and temporarily held by the United States Army.

CurrentEdit

Reynosa extends across 3,156.34 sq kilometers (1218.66 sq. miles), representing 3.7 per cent of the Tamaulipas territory. Today it is the location of several satellite U.S. companies doing business to take advantage of low labor rates and industry incentives.[6]

On 18 September 2012, an explosion at the nearby Pemex gas plant killed 30 and injured 46 people. Pemex Director Juan Jose Suarez said that there was "no evidence that it was a deliberate incident, or some kind of attack".[7][8][9]

ClimateEdit

Reynosa has a semi-arid climate (Köppen climate classification Bsh) with short, mild winters and hot summers.[10] Winters are mild and dry with a January high of 22 °C (72 °F) and a low of 11 °C (52 °F) although temperatures can fall below 10 °C (50 °F).[10] Summers are hot with a July mean of 30 °C (86 °F) and temperatures can exceed 40 °C (104 °F) anytime from May until August.[10] The average annual precipitation is 452 millimetres (18 in), with most of it being concentrated in the summer months though the months May and June are the wettest.

Climate data for Reynosa (1951–2010)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 35.0
(95)
38.0
(100.4)
44.0
(111.2)
42.0
(107.6)
43.0
(109.4)
42.0
(107.6)
43.0
(109.4)
42.0
(107.6)
40.0
(104)
39.0
(102.2)
38.0
(100.4)
36.0
(96.8)
44
(111.2)
Average high °C (°F) 21.9
(71.4)
24.5
(76.1)
29.1
(84.4)
31.8
(89.2)
34.3
(93.7)
36.7
(98.1)
36.9
(98.4)
36.6
(97.9)
35.0
(95)
31.0
(87.8)
26.7
(80.1)
23.0
(73.4)
30.6
(87.1)
Daily mean °C (°F) 16.2
(61.2)
18.4
(65.1)
21.9
(71.4)
24.8
(76.6)
27.6
(81.7)
29.5
(85.1)
29.9
(85.8)
29.8
(85.6)
28.1
(82.6)
24.6
(76.3)
20.6
(69.1)
17.3
(63.1)
24.1
(75.4)
Average low °C (°F) 10.6
(51.1)
12.3
(54.1)
14.8
(58.6)
17.7
(63.9)
21.0
(69.8)
22.2
(72)
22.8
(73)
23.0
(73.4)
21.2
(70.2)
18.3
(64.9)
14.5
(58.1)
11.6
(52.9)
17.5
(63.5)
Record low °C (°F) −2.0
(28.4)
−4.0
(24.8)
2.0
(35.6)
7.5
(45.5)
10.0
(50)
12.0
(53.6)
17.0
(62.6)
14.0
(57.2)
13.0
(55.4)
8.0
(46.4)
0.0
(32)
−7.0
(19.4)
−7
(19.4)
Precipitation mm (inches) 14.6
(0.575)
12.6
(0.496)
7.3
(0.287)
24.8
(0.976)
73.0
(2.874)
99.7
(3.925)
24.3
(0.957)
67.4
(2.654)
72.6
(2.858)
27.4
(1.079)
11.9
(0.469)
16.9
(0.665)
452.5
(17.815)
Source: Servicio Meteorologico Nacional[11]

Notable peopleEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Mexico Census". Instituto Nacional de Estadistica y Geografia. 
  2. ^ "Mexico Census". Instituto Nacional de Estadistica y Geografia. 
  3. ^ "INEGI contó mal en Reynosa: Alcalde". Hoy Tamaulipas. 12/04/2011.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  4. ^ "McAllen Overview". McAllen Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved 26 August 2011. 
  5. ^ "City of Hidalgo, Texas". Profile of Hidalgo, Texas. Retrieved 3 November 2011. 
  6. ^ "Four-part series on globalization". Cfomaquiladoras.org. Retrieved 2012-02-16. 
  7. ^ "Mexican Tamaulipas state gas plant blast kills 26". BBC. 19 September 2012. Retrieved 20 September 2012. 
  8. ^ "Mexico probes Pemex gas plant explosion which killed 26". BBC. 20 September 2012. Retrieved 20 September 2012. 
  9. ^ "Blast at Pemex gas plant in Mexico claims more lives". BBC News. 20 September 2012. 
  10. ^ a b c "Cozumel". Enciclopedia de los Municipios de México (in Spanish). Secretaría de Gobernación. Retrieved April 13, 2013. 
  11. ^ NORMALES CLIMATOLÓGICAS 1951–2010 (in Spanish). National Meteorological Service of Mexico. Retrieved September 30, 2012.

External linksEdit