Last modified on 22 November 2014, at 14:12

List of Malmö FF seasons

For details of the current season, see 2014 Malmö FF season.
An association football team poses for a formative black-and-white photograph. A row of seven men sits on a bench, all wearing light-coloured shirts and white shorts apart from the player in the centre, who wears black. A football rests on the ground between his feet. Behind the seated row stand seven more men, all but one of whom are wearing the same light-coloured shirts. The exception is a gentleman standing at the end of the row on the viewer's right, who wears a dark double-breasted suit, tie and wide-brimmed fedora hat. All of those present have their arms folded apart from the man in the suit, whose hands are behind his back. In the background a set of goalposts can be seen.
The Malmö FF team of 1943–44, when the club won Allsvenskan for the first time

Malmö Fotbollförening, commonly called Malmö FF, is a Swedish professional association football club based in Malmö, whose first team play in the highest tier of Swedish football, Allsvenskan, as of the 2014 season. Malmö FF was founded on 24 February 1910 by 19 members of a predecessor club named BK Idrott who, for a short time, had been merged with cross-town rivals IFK Malmö.[1] After participating in regional competitions and national cup play in Svenska Mästerskapet during the 1910s, Malmö FF joined Sweden's newly created national league system in 1920, and played in the second tier of Swedish football for the next decade – with the exception of one season in Svenska Serien, then unofficially the top football league in Sweden. Allsvenskan was established as Sweden's official first tier in 1924, and Malmö FF first took part in 1931.[2]

The Swedish Football Association prohibited professionalism until 1967,[3] and Malmö FF were demoted in 1934 for having paid players.[4] They were promoted back in 1936, and have since had several periods of consistent success, most notably in the early 1950s, the 1970s and the 1980s. The pinnacle of the club's history came in 1979, when, as finalists in both the European Cup and Intercontinental Cup, Malmö FF were ranked as one of the strongest clubs in the world.[5] After winning a record five consecutive Allsvenskan titles between 1985 and 1989, the club won nothing during the 1990s and were relegated for the first time in 1999, though they returned to the top flight a year later.[6] They have since remained in Allsvenskan, and won an additional four league titles.[7]

As of the end of the 2014 season, Malmö FF have played 103 seasons, 93 of which have been spent within the Swedish league system. The club have contested Allsvenskan 79 times, and have won the competition on 21 occasions.[8] Malmö FF have been demoted once (in 1934) and relegated once (in 1999); their 63 successive Allsvenskan seasons between 1936 and 1999 is a league record.[9] Their worst league finish to date is sixth in the second tier, their placing at the end of the 1926–27 season. The 1950 season was Malmö FF's best in terms of league performance: the team were unbeaten all year, won 20 out of 22 league games, and collectively scored 82 league goals, a club record which still stands.[10] Hans Håkansson holds the record for most league goals for Malmö FF during a single season; he scored 30 goals in 18 matches during the 1935–36 season in the second-tier.[11] Excluding second-tier seasons, however, the record belongs to Bo Larsson, whose tally of 28 goals in 22 games during 1965 remains unmatched today.[12]

HistoryEdit

An impressive trophy of a somewhat cubist fashion. Made of silver, it comprises a large socle, a large semi-circular handle on each side and a depiction of an old-fashioned leather football on top. The words "Lennart Johanssons Pokal" can be seen engraved on the front.
Lennart Johanssons Pokal, the current trophy awarded to the Swedish football champions, here seen in 2010 in Malmö FF's ownership after winning Allsvenskan the same year

When Malmö FF was founded in 1910, there was no established official league system in Swedish football. The club therefore competed in two cup competitions: the nationally-organised Svenska Mästerskapet, and Distriktsmästerskapet, the regional championship of Scania. The team's best performances during these early years were when they reached the Svenska Mästerskapet quarter-finals in 1920, and the Distriktsmästerskapet final twice, in 1916 and 1918.[13] The club would go on to win Distriktsmästerskapet 27 times before the competition was abolished in 1966.[14]

The Swedish Football Association introduced an official league system in 1920, and placed Malmö FF in a regional section of the second tier, Division 2 Sydsvenska Serien.[15] Malmö FF won the league in its first season, and were promoted to Division 1 Svenska Serien Västra, one of the first-tier divisions. However, they were relegated back to Division 2 Sydsvenska Serien after a single season. Achieving mid-table positions in this league, Malmö FF stayed in the second tier after it was renamed Division 2 Södra for the 1928–29 season.[2] The club won Division 2 Södra at the end of the 1930–31 season and were promoted to Allsvenskan for the first time since the new national first-tier league had been established before the 1924–25 season.[16] Malmö FF remained in Allsvenskan until 1934, when the club was found to have paid players in spite of the league's then-mandatory amateurism,[4] which remained in place until 1967.[3] For this, they were demoted to Division 2 Södra; several players and members of staff were banned. Malmö FF won the Division 2 Södra title at the first attempt, but failed to win the play-offs which decided promotion back to Allsvenskan. They retained the title the following year, 1936, and this time won the promotion play-offs.[17]

Over the following decade, Malmö FF established themselves as a permanent fixture in Allsvenskan. The side had a period of great success in the late 1940s and early 1950s, when they finished within the top three in Allsvenskan for ten years in a row, securing five league titles.[18] The club also won the main Swedish cup tournament, Svenska Cupen (established in 1941), five times during the same period. The club continued to finish in the upper half of the league table and experienced additional periods of success during the late 1960s and the 1970s.[19] Malmö FF also qualified for European competition arranged by The Union of European Football Associations (UEFA), doing so for the first time during the 1964–65 season when they entered the European Cup (qualifying as Allsvenskan leaders during the European summer, as Sweden had switched to a season format based around the calendar year).[12] The club qualified for continental competitions 12 times in a row between 1971 and 1982.[20]

During the 1980s and 1990s, the Swedish FA experimented with the competition format: between 1982 and 1990, the Swedish championship was given to the winners of a play-off held between the four best-placed Allsvenskan teams. A championship league was contested by the top six clubs in the league in 1991 and 1992. The pre-1982 format was then restored.[21][A] Malmö FF won Allsvenskan a record five times in a row between 1985 and 1989, but only won the play-offs in 1986 and 1988.[22] After a brief successful period in the mid-1990s, the club began to decline in Allsvenskan and found themselves relegated in 1999, the first time since 1936 they were out of the top division. The team were relegated to the newly created Superettan.[23]

Malmö FF won promotion back to Allsvenskan after only one season in Superettan,[24] and once again established themselves as a successful top-level club during the first decade of the 21st century. After a meagre season in 2001, they finished in the top three for three successive seasons between 2002 and 2004, and won their first Allsvenskan title since 1989 in 2004.[25] Malmö FF then became a mid-table team as they finished between the fifth and ninth positions during the latter part of the decade, before they won the league once more in 2010, the club's centenary year.[26] This earnt the club qualification into Svenska Supercupen, an annual Super Cup match inaugurated in 2007 in which the Allsvenskan champions face the winners of Svenska Cupen. Malmö FF lost the 2011 edition 2–1 to regional rivals Helsingborgs IF.[27] Following the 2010 championship winning year Malmö FF won bronze and small silver medals before winning the gold medal once more in 2013.[28] After this they won Svenska Supercupen for the first time with a win against rivals IFK Göteborg.[29] This was the first time since the 1989 season that the club won two official titles in the same season. In 2014 Malmö FF defended the league title for the first time since 1989 and the Swedish championship for the first time since 1975.[30] In the same season Malmö FF also became the first Swedish club to play in the group stage of the UEFA Champions League in fourteen years.[31]

KeyEdit

Key to competitions

SeasonsEdit

A black-and-white action shot taken in the midst of an association football match. To the viewer's right a player in light shirt, white shorts and white socks turns to his right, his eyes pointed down towards the ball. A shield bearing the letters "MFF" is prominently displayed on his shirt. Behind him, an opposing player in a white shirt can be seen stumbling mid-chase, throwing his arms forward to break his fall.
Malmö FF's Bertil Nilsson (right), pictured in 1959

1910–1919Edit

Season[33] Svenska Mästerskapet Distriktsmästerskapet
1910 [C]
1911–12 DNE SF
1912–13 DNE SF
1913–14 DNE SF
1914–15 DNE SF
1915–16 DNE QF
1916–17[D] DNE RU
2QR SF
1918 QR RU
1919 2QR QF

Since 1920Edit

Season League Cup and Play-offs UEFA Competitions[E] League top goalscorer Ref
Div Pld W D L GF GA Pts Pos Att EC/CL Other Name Goals
1920–21 D2 10 7 1 2 31 20 15 1st promoted 968 n/a n/a n/a Andersson, JohanJohan Andersson 12 [13]
1921–22 [F] &
n/a n/a n/a [34]
1922–23 D1 10 1 2 7 6 19 4 6th relegated 1,471 n/a n/a n/a Gudmundsson, Gudmundsson 3 [34]
1923–24 D2 10 6 3 1 20 7 15 2nd 553 n/a n/a n/a Lindblad, Lindblad 8 [34]
1924–25 D2 14 6 3 5 35 32 15 5th 718 n/a n/a n/a Ohrn Öhrn 7 [35]
1925–26 D2 16 5 8 3 44 24 18 3rd 909 n/a n/a n/a Rosén, Rosén
Svensson, Svensson
7 [35]
1926–27 D2 18 7 4 7 30 31 18 6th 1,414 n/a n/a n/a Svensson, Svensson 10 [36]
1927–28 D2 20 11 4 5 42 41 26 3rd 2,124 n/a n/a n/a Roslund, Roslund
Hakansson Håkansson
14 [36]
1928–29 D2 18 8 2 8 63 44 18 4th 2,239 n/a n/a n/a Hakansson Håkansson 10 [37]
1929–30 D2 18 9 2 7 47 34 20 2nd 2,727 n/a n/a n/a Hakansson Håkansson 21 [37]
1930–31 D2 18 11 3 4 50 2 25 1st promoted 2,222 n/a n/a n/a Hakansson Håkansson 13 [38]
1931–32 AS 22 6 4 12 48 68 16 9th 6,881 n/a n/a n/a Hakansson Håkansson 18 [38]
1932–33 AS 22 8 3 11 42 66 19 9th 7,683 n/a n/a n/a Hakansson Håkansson 15 [39]
1933–34 AS 13 5 0 8 27 38 0 relegated[G] 7,212 n/a n/a n/a Hakansson Håkansson 8 [39]
1934–35 D2 18 13 5 0 66 21 31 1st 5,570 PPO – RU n/a n/a Hakansson Håkansson 24 [11]
1935–36 D2 18 14 2 2 61 17 30 1st promoted 5,809 PPO – W n/a n/a Hakansson Håkansson 30 [11]
1936–37 AS 22 9 3 10 39 45 21 6th 8,615 n/a n/a n/a Hakansson Håkansson 15 [40]
1937–38 AS 22 6 8 8 20 30 20 9th 9,764 n/a n/a n/a Andersson, JohnJohn Andersson 5 [40]
1938–39 AS 22 9 7 6 30 29 25 3rd 9,008 n/a n/a n/a Andersson, O.O. Andersson 16 ♦ [41]
1939–40 AS 22 4 10 8 25 28 18 10th 5,998 n/a n/a n/a Sandberg, Sandberg
Nilsson, A.A. Nilsson
Ericsson, Ericsson
4 [41]
1940–41 AS 22 7 8 7 33 33 22 8th 7,844 SC – R2 n/a n/a Martinsson, Martinsson 8 [42]
1941–42 AS 22 9 7 6 37 33 25 5th 8,753 SC – R2 n/a n/a Martinsson, Martinsson 7 [42]
1942–43 AS 22 10 5 7 44 30 25 5th 8,218 SC – QF n/a n/a Tapper, B.B. Tapper 10 [43]
1943–44 AS 22 17 3 2 54 22 37 1st 11,362 SC – W n/a n/a Tapper, B.B. Tapper
Nilsson, S.S. Nilsson
11 [43]
1944–45 AS 22 12 4 6 58 31 28 3rd 11,226 SC – RU n/a n/a Jonsson Jönsson 13 [44]
1945–46 AS 22 13 4 5 48 27 30 2nd 11,869 SC – W n/a n/a Nilsson, G.G. Nilsson 14 [45]
1946–47 AS 22 10 8 4 51 30 28 3rd 12,733 SC – W n/a n/a Jonsson Jönsson 10 [45]
1947–48 AS 22 12 5 5 60 33 29 2nd 15,136 DNE[H] n/a n/a Jonsson Jönsson 14 [46]
1948–49 AS 22 12 5 5 72 29 29 1st 16,308 SC – QF n/a n/a Tapper, B.B. Tapper 18 [46]
1949–50 AS 22 20 2 0 82 21 42 1st 17,290 SC – QF n/a n/a Rydell, Rydell 21 ♦ [10]
1950–51 AS 22 16 5 1 52 22 37 1st 17,048 SC – W n/a n/a Jonsson Jönsson 14 [47]
1951–52 AS 22 15 2 5 50 17 32 2nd 14,334 n/a n/a n/a Rydell, Rydell 13 [48]
1952–53 AS 22 14 3 5 60 32 31 1st 14,002 SC – W n/a n/a Sandell, Sandell 22 [49]
1953–54 AS 22 8 6 8 33 30 22 7th 16,361 n/a n/a n/a Sandell, Sandell 12 [50]
1954–55 AS 22 8 5 9 33 33 21 8th 15,020 n/a n/a n/a Oberg Öberg 9 [50]
1955–56 AS 22 14 4 4 60 26 32 2nd 16,531 n/a Sandell, Sandell 20 [51]
1956–57 AS 22 11 6 5 50 30 28 2nd 15,540 n/a Gustafsson, Gustafsson 18 [51]
1957–58 AS 33 16 8 9 62 49 40 4th 12,330 n/a Gustafsson, Gustafsson 16 [52]
1959 AS 22 12 4 6 50 29 28 5th 15,170 n/a Nilsson, B.B. Nilsson
Svahn, Svahn
Ekström, Ekström
9 [52]
1960 AS 22 9 4 9 33 33 22 4th 10,381 n/a Svahn, Svahn 8 [53]
1961 AS 22 10 4 8 31 34 24 5th 10,541 n/a Svahn, Svahn 8 [53]
1962 AS 22 9 4 9 32 40 22 8th 9,663 n/a Eriksson, R.R. Eriksson 10 [54]
1963 AS 22 11 5 6 43 31 27 4th 10,104 n/a Larsson, B.B. Larsson 17 ♦ [54]
1964 AS 22 13 5 4 45 20 31 2nd 15,284 n/a QR Larsson, B.B. Larsson 11 [12]
1965 AS 22 15 4 3 64 24 34 1st 13,963 n/a ICFC – R1 Larsson, B.B. Larsson 28 ♦ [12]
1966 AS 22 6 7 9 32 34 19 9th 10,340 n/a R1 Larsson, B.B. Larsson 7 [55]
1967 AS 22 14 5 3 53 21 33 1st 13,992 SC – W ICFC – R1 Szepanski, Szepanski 22 ♦ [56]
1968 AS 22 11 5 6 42 27 27 2nd 15,521 SC – QF R1 Tapper, S.S. Tapper 9 [57]
1969 AS 22 11 6 5 34 27 28 2nd 12,776 SC – R5 ICFC – R1 Tapper, S.S. Tapper 12 [57]
1970 AS 22 11 7 4 30 20 29 1st 13,036 SC – RU ICFC – R1 Larsson, B.B. Larsson 16 ♦ [58]
1971 AS 22 12 6 4 46 26 22 1st 16,375 SC – R4 R1 Larsson, B.B. Larsson 13 [59]
1972 AS 22 9 5 8 27 26 23 6th 10,668 SC – W R1 Tapper, S.S. Tapper
Andersson, C.C. Andersson
6 [60]
1973 AS 26 12 6 8 46 32 30 4th 9,970 SC – W CWC – R2 Andersson, C.C. Andersson 12 [60]
1974 AS 26 19 5 2 48 15 43 1st 10,412 SC – W CWC – QF Sjoberg Sjöberg 14 [61]
1975 AS 26 18 6 2 53 17 42 1st 11,474 SC – SF R2 Cervin, Cervin 20 [62]
1976 AS 26 12 11 3 37 21 35 2nd 11,192 SC – SF R1 Sjoberg Sjöberg 13 [63]
1977 AS 26 15 8 3 41 19 38 1st 10,875 SC – W UC – R1 Hansson, Hansson 11 [63]
1978 AS 26 12 8 6 29 15 32 2nd 8,872 SC – R6 RU Sjoberg Sjöberg
Andersson, T.T. Andersson
6 [64]
1979 AS 26 12 8 6 30 24 32 4th 7,636 SC – W

UC – R2

Andersson, T.T. Andersson 5 [65]
1980 AS 26 13 9 4 37 22 35 2nd 8,488 SC – R5 CWC – R2 Hansson, Hansson 10 [65]
1981 AS 26 11 5 10 48 44 27 5th 6,212 SC – QF UC – R2 Sjoberg Sjöberg 13 [66]
1982 AS 22 7 11 4 23 15 25 4th 6,482 SC – R5

CPO – SF

Sjoberg Sjöberg 7 [66]
1983 AS 22 12 5 5 46 30 29 2nd 9,596

CPO – SF

UC – R1 Larsson, L.L. Larsson 12 [67]
1984 AS 22 11 5 6 47 24 27 3rd 7,491 SC – R5

CPO – QF

CWC – R1 Magnusson, Magnusson 15 [67]
1985 AS 22 11 8 3 29 14 30 1st 7,829

CPO – SF

UC – R1 Magnusson, Magnusson 7 [68]
1986 AS 22 16 5 1 49 11 37 1st 5,798 SC – SF
CWC – QF Larsson, L.L. Larsson 12 [68]
1987 AS 22 14 6 2 50 21 34 1st 5,681 SC – SF
R1 Larsson, L.L. Larsson 20 ♦ [69]
1988 AS 22 15 2 5 45 26 32 1st 5,285
UC – R2 Dahlin, Dahlin 22 ♦ [70]
1989 AS 22 12 7 3 35 11 31 1st 4,621 SC – R6
R2 Engqvist, Engqvist 15 [71]
1990 AS 22 6 10 6 20 15 28[I] 6th 4,513 SC – QF R2 Dahlin, Dahlin 7 [71]
1991 AS

MS

18

10

7

3

8

3

3

4

20

9

14

11

29

27

3rd

4th

4,005 SC – R5 Dahlin, Dahlin 11 [72]
1992 AS

MS

18

10

7

3

5

2

6

5

22

11

16

14

26

24

5th

6th

4,824 SC – R3 Andersson, P.P. Andersson
Ohlsson, Ohlsson
7 [72]
1993 AS 26 10 5 11 43 38 35 10th 5,855 SC – SF Ohlsson, Ohlsson
Andersson, P.P. Andersson
6 [73]
1994 AS 26 14 7 5 51 33 49 3rd 5,817 SC – R5 Pettersson, Pettersson 14 [73]
1995 AS 26 9 12 5 32 28 39 4th 5,537 SC – RU UC – R1 Pettersson, Pettersson 15 [74]
1996 AS 26 13 7 6 33 26 46 2nd 5,244 SC – R3 UC – R1 Fjellstrom Fjellström 6 [74]
1997 AS 26 12 10 4 48 28 46 3rd 6,820 SC – R3 UC – QR2 Kindvall, Kindvall 12 [75]
1998 AS 26 9 6 11 35 30 33 9th 7,014 SC – SF UC – QR2 Pavlovic, Pavlovic 10 [75]
1999 AS 26 7 4 15 30 48 25 13th relegated 7,620 SC – R2 Lilienberg, Lilienberg 11 [76]
2000 SE 30 20 3 7 48 32 60 2nd promoted 6,153 SC – SF Ibrahimović, Ibrahimović 12 [76]
2001 AS 26 9 5 12 39 46 32 9th 11,315 Ohlsson, Ohlsson 7 [77]
2002 AS 26 14 4 8 52 32 46 2nd 13,057 SC – SF Ijeh, Ijeh 24 ♦ [77]
2003 AS 26 14 6 6 50 23 48 3rd 18,715 SC – R4 UC – R1 Skoog, Skoog 22 ♦ [78]
2004 AS 26 15 7 4 44 21 52 1st 20,061 SC – R3 UIC – R1 Alves, Alves 12 [78]
2005 AS 26 12 5 9 38 27 41 5th 15,962 SC – R4 QR3 UC – R1 Alves, Alves 14 [79]
2006 AS 26 10 8 8 43 39 38 7th 13,665 SC – R3 Johansson, Johansson 11 [80]
2007 AS 26 9 7 10 29 28 34 9th 13,364 SC – R3 JúniorJúnior 9 [80]
2008 AS 30 12 8 10 51 46 44 6th 11,182 SC – R4 Toivonen, Toivonen 14 [81]
2009 AS 30 11 10 9 40 25 43 7th 14,815 SC – R3 Larsson, D.D. Larsson 11 [81]
2010 AS 30 21 4 5 59 24 67 1st 15,194 SC – R4 Mehmeti, Mehmeti 11 [82]
2011 AS 30 15 9 6 37 30 54 4th 12,388 SC – QF
PO EL – GS Larsson, D.D. Larsson 6 [83]
2012 AS 30 16 8 6 49 33 56 3rd 14,799 SC – GS Ranégie, Ranégie 10 [84]
2013 AS 30 19 6 5 56 30 63 1st 16,039 SC – SF
EL – QR3 Eriksson, M.M. Eriksson 11 [85]
2014 AS 30 18 8 4 59 31 62 1st 14,090 SC – GS
GS Rosenberg, Rosenberg 15 [86]

FootnotesEdit

A broad-shouldered, Nordic-looking association football player, pictured mid-match. Looking to his left (the viewer's right), he sports a sky blue, white and black shirt and white shorts, and a red and white striped band around his left arm.
Malmö FF midfielder Niclas Nyhlén, pictured in 1996 as the team's captain
A. ^ The title of "Swedish Champions" has been awarded to the winner of four different competitions over the course of Swedish football history. Between 1896 and 1925 the title was awarded to the winner of Svenska Mästerskapet, a stand-alone cup tournament. No club were given the title between 1926 and 1930, even though a first-tier league, Allsvenskan, was contested. In 1931, the title was reinstated and thereafter awarded to the winners of Allsvenskan. Between 1982 and 1990, a play-off round was held in cup format at the end of the league season to decide the national champions. In 1991, the play-offs were replaced by Mästerskapsserien, an additional league round held following Allsvenskan to decide the title-winners. After two editions, Mästerskapsserien too was abolished. Since the 1993 season, the winners of Allsvenskan have been awarded the national championship.[21]
B. ^ According to Allsvenskan tradition, players and staff of the best four teams, rather than the best three, are awarded medals. The winners are awarded the "gold" medal, the runners-up the "big silver" medal, the team finishing third the "small silver" medal and the team finishing in fourth place the "bronze" medal. The principle of awarding four medals rather than three has its root in the Svenska Mästerskapet of the early 20th century, in which both losing semi-finalists would receive bronze medals as no third-place match would be played. Only Allsvenskan uses this system; this list therefore does not use it to denote league finishes in lower divisions.[87]
C. ^ Malmö FF played no competitive football during the 1910 season.[13]
D. ^ The 1917 Svenska Mästerskapet and 1917 Distriksmästerskapet are part of the 1916–17 season due to the fact that the season format changed to the calendar year format for the 1918 season.[13]
E. ^ Only competitions which are part of UEFA's official European record are included here.[88] The Inter-Cities Fairs Cup, though a non-UEFA competition, is officially recognised as UEFA Cup's precursor, and is therefore also incorporated into this list.[89] The 1979 Intercontinental Cup co-hosted by UEFA and CONMEBOL is also included in this list.[90][91]
F. ^ Malmö FF played no competitive football during the 1921–22 season.[34]
G. ^ Malmö FF were disqualified from the competition and demoted a division as punishment for paying players in spite of Swedish Football Association rules prohibiting professionalism among its member clubs.[4] Professional players were first allowed by the Swedish Football Association in 1967.[3]
H. ^ All Allsvenskan clubs decided not to enter the 1948 Svenska Cupen due to several key players participating in the football tournament at the 1948 Summer Olympics in London. Sweden won the gold medal after defeating Yugoslavia in the final.[92]
I. ^ The 1990 season saw the introduction of three points for a win.[93]

ReferencesEdit

General
  • Smitt, Rikard (2009). Ända sen gamla dagar... Project Management AB. ISBN 978-91-633-5767-1.  (in Swedish)
Specific
  1. ^ Smitt, 2009, pp. 14–16.
  2. ^ a b Smitt, 2009, pp. 20–21.
  3. ^ a b c Billing, Tomas; Peterson; Franzén, Mats (2004). "Paradoxes of football professionalisation in Sweden : A club approach". Soccer and Society (Frank Cass) 5 (1): 82–99. doi:10.1080/14660970512331391014. ISSN 1743-9590. 
  4. ^ a b c Smitt, 2009, pp. 26–27.
  5. ^ "1978/79: Forest join élite club". uefa.com. UEFA. Retrieved 9 February 2012. 
  6. ^ Smitt, 2009, pp. 84–90.
  7. ^ Smitt, 2009, pp. 94–95.
  8. ^ "Fakta" [Facts]. mff.se (in Swedish). Malmö FF. Retrieved 11 February 2012. 
  9. ^ "Lagrekord" [Team records]. svenskfotboll.se (in Swedish). The Swedish Football Association. Retrieved 11 February 2012. 
  10. ^ a b Smitt, 2009, p. 273.
  11. ^ a b c Smitt, 2009, p. 265.
  12. ^ a b c d Smitt, 2009, p. 282.
  13. ^ a b c d Smitt, 2009, p. 258.
  14. ^ Smitt, 2009, pp. 258–283.
  15. ^ Smitt, 2009, p. 20.
  16. ^ Smitt, 2009, p. 21.
  17. ^ Smitt, 2009, pp. 27–28.
  18. ^ Smitt, 2009, pp. 32–50.
  19. ^ Smitt, 2009, pp. 56–67.
  20. ^ "Svenska lag i de europeiska cuperna" [Swedish clubs in European cup play]. svenskfotboll.se (in Swedish). The Swedish Football Association. Retrieved 9 February 2012. 
  21. ^ a b "Svenska mästare 1896–1925, 1931–" [Swedish champions 1896–1925, 1931–]. svenskfotboll.se (in Swedish). The Swedish Football Association. Retrieved 11 February 2012. 
  22. ^ Smitt, 2009, pp. 78–80.
  23. ^ Smitt, 2009, p. 88.
  24. ^ Smitt, 2009, pp. 89–90.
  25. ^ Smitt, 2009, pp. 91–92.
  26. ^ "Malmö FF – Svenska mästare 2010" [Malmö FF – Swedish champions 2010]. mff.se (in Swedish). Malmö FF. Retrieved 9 February 2012. 
  27. ^ "Helsingborg tog hem Supercupen 2011" [Helsingborg won the 2011 Supercupen]. svenskfotboll.se (in Swedish). The Swedish Football Association. Retrieved 9 February 2012. 
  28. ^ "Malmö FF är svenska mästare 2013!" [Malmö FF are Swedish champions 2013!]. mff.se (in Swedish). Malmö FF. 28 October 2013. Retrieved 14 November 2013. 
  29. ^ "Malmö FF vann Supercupen" [Malmö FF wins Supercupen]. mff.se (in Swedish). Malmö FF. 10 November 2013. Retrieved 14 November 2013. 
  30. ^ "Malmö FF är svenska mästare 2014" [Malmö FF are Swedish Champions 2014]. mff.se (in Swedish). Malmö FF. 5 October 2014. Retrieved 7 October 2014. 
  31. ^ "Malmö FF är inne i Champions League" [Malmö FF into the Champions League]. mff.se (in Swedish). Malmö FF. 28 August 2014. Retrieved 30 August 2014. 
  32. ^ "Allsvenska skyttekungar & publiksnitt 1924/255-" [Allsvenskan top scorers and average attendance 1924/25-]. svenskfotboll.se (in Swedish). The Swedish Football Association. Retrieved 9 February 2012. 
  33. ^ Smitt, 2009, pp. 258–309.
  34. ^ a b c d Smitt, 2009, p. 259.
  35. ^ a b Smitt, 2009, p. 260.
  36. ^ a b Smitt, 2009, p. 261.
  37. ^ a b Smitt, 2009, p. 262.
  38. ^ a b Smitt, 2009, p. 263.
  39. ^ a b Smitt, 2009, p. 264.
  40. ^ a b Smitt, 2009, p. 266.
  41. ^ a b Smitt, 2009, p. 267.
  42. ^ a b Smitt, 2009, p. 268.
  43. ^ a b Smitt, 2009, p. 269.
  44. ^ Smitt, 2009, p. 270.
  45. ^ a b Smitt, 2009, p. 271.
  46. ^ a b Smitt, 2009, p. 272.
  47. ^ Smitt, 2009, p. 274.
  48. ^ Smitt, 2009, p. 275.
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